sunnuntai 27. toukokuuta 2018

9 Candida Symptoms & 3 Steps to Treat Them

9 Candida Symptoms & 3 Steps to Treat Them
Candida symptoms - Dr. Axe


Do you ever experience any of these health issues?
  • Exhaustion
  • Cravings for sweets
  • Bad breath
  • White coating on tongue
  • Brain fog
  • Hormone imbalance
  • Joint pain
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Chronic sinus and allergy issues
  • Digestive problems (gas and bloating)
  • Weak immune system
  • UTI
If so, these are just some of the signs that you may have a fungal infection known as candida. In this article you will learn other candida symptoms along with what causes candida and the diet to naturally treat candida.
Are you suffering from candida symptoms? Click here for a PDF guide on how to cure candida

What Is Candida?

Candida can be very serious. Recently, a “superbug” candida species known as Candida auris has emerged as a dangerous health threat in several countries and many health care facilities in the U.S. This version of candida — which often spreads through candida biofilms on surfaces such as catheters and bedrails — has proven resistant to multiple drugs, resulting in serious illness.
Candida albicans is the most common type of yeast infection found in the mouth, intestinal tract and vagina, and it may affect skin and other mucous membranes. If the immune system is functioning optimally, this type of yeast infection is rarely serious. However, if the immune system is not functioning properly, the candida infection can migrate to other areas of the body, including the blood and membranes around the heart or brain, causing serious candida symptoms. (1)
Candida is a fungus that aids with nutrient absorption and digestion when in proper levels in the body. When it overproduces, typical candida symptoms may appear. In the digestive tract, if left unchecked, it breaks down the walls of the intestinal lining and penetrates into the bloodstream. This releases byproduct toxins and other toxins from your system, causingleaky gut syndrome.
When your body’s natural pH balance is upset, the candida yeasts can grow out of control, creating a systemic problem and unpleasant candida symptoms. Good healthy bacteria and a properly functioning immune system are essential when fighting this stubborn infection.
Candida overgrowth syndrome, or COS, is the term used when candida has grown out of control in your body. Make no mistake: This is a chronic health condition. In addition to candida symptoms, individuals who have never experienced a serious yeast infection can find they have developed new sensitivities, allergies or intolerances to a variety of foods. These foods include dairy, eggs, corn and gluten.

What Causes Candida Infections?

There are many possible causes of candida, including a diet high in sugar, refined carbohydrates and alcohol that help feed candida. To add to that, I’ve described six other potential causes below.

1. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics

Sometimes, antibiotics are needed to fight a stubborn infection to kill the offending bacteria in your system. The problem with antibiotics and with overusing them (often creating antibiotic resistance) is that they don’t just kill the bad bacteria; they kill the good ones, too.
The good bacteria in your system are responsible for digestion and keeping candida under control. After a long course (or multiple courses over a short period), antibiotics can make your body a literal breeding ground for candida.

2. Birth Control Pills

Unlike antibiotics, birth control pills in and of themselves do not directly cause a yeast infection or candida overgrowth syndrome. However, when a woman consumes a diet high in refined sugars and has had a course of antibiotics, birth control pills can adversely affect her body, leading to a candida infection.
Some women find that birth control pills seem to instigate yeast infections — and even long after the initial infection is gone, once they start taking the birth control pills again, candida can take root.

3. Oral Corticosteroids

Individuals who treat their asthma with corticosteroid inhalants are at an increased risk of developing candida in the mouth, leading to systemic candida overgrowth. (2) It is imperative that individuals using corticosteroid inhalers for asthma follow the directions for swishing the mouth out after each use. If oral candidiasis is detected, it can be treated with the gargling of coconut oil and a drop or two of essential clove oil.

4. Cancer Treatments

According to the Department of Clinical Research at Merck Research Laboratories, candidiasis can become invasive in cancer patients and present a serious complication. (3) In this study, one-third of patients being treated for cancer had “invasive” candidiasis. Chemotherapy and radiation can both work to kill cancerous cells and tumors; however, they also kill off the healthy bacteria that naturally fight candida.

5. Diabetes

In a Type 1 or a Type 2 diabetic, sugar levels in the mouth and other mucous membranes are traditionally higher than in an individual without diabetes. Since candida is a type of yeast and sugar feeds yeast, it is understandable that those with diabetes are at a greater risk for developing candida overgrowth syndrome.

6. Weakened Immune System

Any individual with a weakened immune system is more likely to develop candida. This population includes infants, small children, the elderly, those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS (4), and other inflammatory and autoimmune conditions.

9 Candida Symptoms

Candida yeast overgrowth can be difficult for a physician to diagnosis. This type of systemic yeast infection presents different ways in different people. Below are nine of the candida symptoms to watch for if you are concerned you have candida, or candida overgrowth syndrome.

1. Chronic Fatigue

If you have fatigue or exhaustion that you simply cannot shake, regardless of the number of hours you sleep, you may have chronic fatigue syndrome. The disease is characterized by fatigue that lasts a minimum of six months and is often accompanied by other candida symptoms, including headaches, joint pain, difficulties with memory and concentration, and sore throat. (5)
Often one of the candida symptoms is chronic fatigue. While a candida infection is not the only cause of chronic fatigue syndrome, many physicians believe it heightens the risk of CFS.

2. Mood Disorders

One of the reasons it can be difficult to diagnose candida is that so many of the candida symptoms are common to other conditions, including mood disorders. Individuals with candida overgrowth may experience dramatic mood swings, anxiety, irritability, depression and even panic attacks.

3. Recurring Vaginal and Urinary Tract Infections

When an individual experiences recurring infections in the urinary tract or vagina, candida may be at the root of the problem. It is important to realize that candida can be sexually transmitted, and partners can spread it back and forth. For women, reduce the risk by avoiding tight-fitting underwear or pantyhose and avoid hot baths during an active infection. (6)

4. Oral Thrush

Oral thrush is actually a yeast infection caused by the same strain of candida that affects other mucous membranes, including the vagina. It’s most often caused by the use of prednisone or other oral corticosteroids as mentioned above. Left untreated, it may spread through the body, including the digestive tract, lungs, liver and heart valves.
Oral candida is communicable. Newborns can get thrush during birth; children can get it from sharing toys with other children; and adults can pass it back and forth through the saliva. (7)

5. Sinus Infections

As with many of these other candida symptoms, sinus infections are common today, and it can be difficult to pinpoint the root of the cause. Candida does affect the sinuses and can result in a persistent cough, post-nasal drip, an increase in congestion, seasonal allergies, and general flu-like symptoms. If you experience consistent problems with your sinuses, it’s time to check for a candida infection!

6. Intestinal Distress

Ongoing intestinal distress is one of the more uncomfortable candida symptoms. Persistent flatulence, burping, bloating, constipation or diarrhea, and stomach cramps may be caused by a lack of healthy bacteria in your digestive tract.
When yeast overtakes the intestines, healthy bacteria are undermanned, and cannot fight off the infection alone. When the bacteria in your gut are out of balance, it’s known as dysbiosis. Many individuals experience dramatic relief of chronic intestinal distress when effectively treating a candida infection.

7. Brain Fog

Along with mood changes and chronic fatigue, brain fog is often overlooked as one of the candida symptoms. However, candida overgrowth can cause a lack of focus, poor physical coordination, difficulty in concentrating on tasks and poor memory.

8. Skin and Nail Fungal Infections

Athlete’s foot and fungus in the toenail are common yeast infections, which stem from the same strain of candida. Continued infections may be a sign that you have a systemic candida infection.

9. Hormonal Imbalance

hormonal imbalance is one of the candida symptoms that presents in many other health conditions. However, it is important to recognize how an infection can cause early menopause, PMS, a low sex drive, migraines, endometriosis, water retention, mood swings and an inability to lose unwanted pounds.
While in the midst of candida overgrowth, your body becomes inflamed, causing the yeast to grow and spread beyond the digestive tract. One of the byproducts of candida actually can mimic estrogen, leading to a serious hormonal imbalance. (8)
Candida symptoms: 9 signs - Dr. Axe

Treatment 1: The Candida Cleanse

The candida cleanse helps to rid the body of excess candida through the flushing of the digestive tract, and the introduction of healthy candida fighters found in fermented vegetables and kefir.
You really have two options for a cleanse: a liquids-only cleanse or a more gentle cleanse with food. You may also opt the most thorough gut reboot: starting with the step one cleanse and then move to the step two cleanse. The whole process will set the stage for starting the candida diet as well!

Option One: Liquids-Only Candida Cleanse (Duration 1–2 Days)

Start by making a vegetable broth from organic onions, garlic, celery, kale, sea salt and pure water. Let simmer and strain. Discard the vegetables and refrigerate the broth.
Throughout the day, sip on the warm broth; it’s imperative that you drink lots of water to help your body expel all the toxins in your system. While this is not a long-term cleanse, it can be repeated as needed every few weeks. It can also be used as a jumpstart to the food cleanse below.

Option Two: Steamed Vegetables (Duration 3–5 Days)

By eliminating grains, sugars, fruits, starches and alcohol from your diet for three to five days, you can make great headway in your fight against candida overgrowth.
Mostly, eat fresh, organic vegetables that have been steamed. For this cleanse stage, keep away from any starchy vegetables like carrots, radishes, beets, sweet potatoes and white potatoes, which may contribute to sugar levels and feed the candida. Continue to drink plenty of pure water, a minimum of 72 ounces per day, to help flush the candida and byproducts from your system.
During this time — no more than once a day — you can eat salads made from leafy greens (like romaine) or bitter greens (like chard) and topped with just a bit of coconut oil and apple cider vinegar (or lemon juice).
During either of the candida cleanses above, you can use bentonite clay to help surround the toxins and efficiently remove them from your system.

Treatment 2: The Candida Diet

This is a diet to not just discourage candida; it’s the diet to help you rid your body of candida! This is also a great next step if you have already started with the candida cleanse.
1. The first step of the diet is to boost your immune system through the elimination of sugar, alcohol and refined carbohydrates. These items are contributing to the growth of the candida in your system.
2. Step two is to replace these foods with organic vegetables, including carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale and asparagus.
According to ancient Chinese medicine, warm starchy vegetables support the spleen in clearing candida from the body. While I don’t recommend these vegetables during the “cleanse” stage, the regular candida diet includes warming fall vegetables that nourish the spleen, such as sweet potatoes, yams, peas, mung beans, lentils, kidney beans, adzuki beans, carrots, beets, corn, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, acorn squash, zucchini, yellow squash, rutabaga and pumpkin. These should be the main sources of carbs that satisfy your cravings for sweets as well.
What about grains? Some grains like quinoa, barley, teff, sorghum and amaranth and a starch like corn can help to dry the overly damp gut, so one serving a day (no more!) of those grains can work for most people with candida.
The same story follows for cold foods, which shouldn’t be consumed more than once per day. Therefore, don’t have a gut-friendly smoothie on the same day you have a salad. Your candida gut will heal most from warm nourishing foods.
As with any food, however, it’s always important to monitor how you feel after consuming a meal when you have candida. Some people who suffer stomach distress after eating any kind of starch, for instance, should avoidstarchy vegetables like corn, peas, parsnips, potatoes, pumpkin, squash, zucchini and yams. Instead, they should eat non-starchy vegetables — typically the flowering parts of the plant — like lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, spinach, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes.
Also, keep fruit intake low as well as natural sweeteners like maple syrup or honey.
3. Add cultured dairy, preferably goat milk kefir, because healthy probiotic foods can effectively kill the candida in your system. Probiotics like kimchi and sauerkraut are good additions to your diet, as well as unsweetened cranberry juice, because they create an acidic environment that makes it difficult for candida to thrive.
Fermented vegetables contain microflora that help to protect the intestines. Regular consumption of fermented foods can help improve the immune system, making the body less hospitable for candida. Begin with a half cup per day of sauerkraut, kimchi or other fermented vegetables as part of a new eating plan dedicated to bringing your body back into a healthy balance.
The candida diet helps to provide beneficial bacteria, regulate appetite, and reduce your cravings for refined carbohydrates and sugars.

Treatment 3: Supplements, Essential Oils & Coconut Oil

Research shows that C. albicans, the strain of candida that leads to systemic candida overgrowth is often resistant to both fluconazole and itraconazole, the antifungal drugs most often prescribed for candida.
1. Coconut oil can effectively fight candida due to its antimicrobial properties. (9) The combination of lauric acid and caprylic acid found in coconut oil, kills off harmful candida through both ingestion and topical application.
2. Milk thistle supplements help to cleanse your liver from prescription medications (steroids, birth control, antibiotics, as well as others), environmental pollution, heavy metals, and the remnants from both chemotherapy and radiation.
As mentioned above, some prescription medications and cancer treatments can lead to candida overgrowth. Milk thistle, along with the candida diet, can help your body recover and create an environment where candida ceases to thrive.
3. Vitamin C helps to boost adrenal glands and helps to restore your immune system. I recommend 1,000 milligrams of vitamin C two or three times per day, taking a total of 2,000 to 3,000 milligrams daily.
4. Clove oil, oregano oil and myrrh oil help to kill a variety of parasites and fungi, including candida, in the body. Lavender oil also inhibits the growth of candida and is effective at preventing the spread of the infection. (10)
For example, by adding a couple of drops of clove oil or lavender oil mixed with coconut oil during your cleanse, you can help to kill off the offending candida. Because these essential oils are powerful, they should only be taken internally for 10 days or less.
Also, for oral thrush, use three drops of clove oil with one tablespoon of coconut oil and swish in the mouth for 20 minutes.
Do not give clove oil internally to children under 2 years of age. If you are pregnant or nursing, check with your natural health care provider before taking clove oil internally.
3 Ways to treat candida symptoms - Dr. Axe

Candida Die-Off Symptoms You May Experience

Rapidly killing off candida in your body creates a metabolic reaction that releases over 70 different toxins into your body. Symptoms that show the candida cleanse and the candida diet are working include:
  • Impaired brain function
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Intestinal distress including bloating, gas, constipation and nausea
  • Sweating and fever
  • Sinus infection
  • Skin breakouts (not limited to face)
  • Typical flu-like symptoms
When you start experiencing the candida die-off symptoms, rejoice! These symptoms usually clear up in seven to 10 days. The candida is leaving your body, and within just a few weeks, you will notice an increase in energy and focus, as well as relief from other symptoms you have experienced.
After your symptoms have subsided and you have completed the cleanse and the diet, you should continue eating a diet that is high in protein and high-fiber vegetables, and limit grains, fruits, sugar and high-starch vegetables like white potatoes. Continue to consume fermented vegetables and kefir to help your body stay in balance and keep the candida at bay.

https://draxe.com/candida-symptoms/

From the sound of it, you might think leaky gut only affects the digestive system, but in reality it can affect more. Because Leaky Gut is so common, and such an enigma, I’m offering a free webinar on all things leaky gut.Click here to learn more about the webinar.

Systemic candidiasis



Other Names:
 
Systemic candida infections; Invasive Candidiasis

Systemic candidiasis includes a spectrum of yeast infections caused by different species (types) of Candida.[1] It is a serious infection that can affect the blood, heart, brain, eyes, bones, or other parts of the body.[2]Although there are over 200 species of Candida, five different species of Candida cause 90% of systemic candidiasis.[1][2][3] The most common form of this invasive yeast infection is when Candida enters the bloodstream (candidemia). Signs of candidemia include fever and chills that do not improve with antibiotics. Symptoms of other types of systemic candidiasis depend on the organ or system which is infected. Systemic candidiasis is the most common fungal infection among hosptilized people in high-income countries, including the United States. Diagnosis can be difficult, especially when the Candida is not found in the bloodstream.[1][2]Treatment usually includes consists of oral or intravenous (IV) antifungal medications.[1][2][3] 
Last updated: 12/15/2016

Common symptoms of candidemia (Candida infection of the bloodstream) include fever and chills that do not improve with antibiotics. Candidemia can cause septic shock and therefore may include symptoms such as low blood pressure, fast heart rate, and rapid breathing.[1][2][3]

Systemic candidiasis may also affect other parts of the body such as the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), abdomen, heart, kidneys, liver, bones, muscles, joints, spleen, and/or eyes.[1][2][3] Candidemia may be present, but not in all cases.[1] Signs and symptoms depend on the organ or system infected.[1][2][3] For example, when Candida infects the eye, symptoms may include blurred vision with photophobia (the eye is overly senstive to light), whereas symptoms of candida endocarditis (Candida infection of the inner lining of the heart) may include fever, shortness of breath, fluid buildup in the arms or legs, tiny red spots on the skin, and weight loss.[1][4] Since many people who develop systemic candidiasis are already sick, it can be difficult to know which symptoms are from Candida infection and which symptoms are from complications of other medical conditions.[2]
Last updated: 12/15/2016

Systemic candidiasis is caused by Candida yeast. Although there are over 200 species (types), the five most common species of Candida to cause systemic infections include C. albicansC. glabrataC. parapsilosisC. tropicalis, and C. kruseiCandida normally live in the digestive tract (gastroinestinal system) and on skin and usually do not cause any problems. However if Candida enters the bloodstream, the yeast may overgrow. The overgrowth of Candida may also spread or occur in other parts of the body, including the liver, spleen, heart, eyes, lining of the abdomen and abdominal organs (peritoneum), kidney, bone, lungs and covering of the spinal cord and brain (meninges).[1][2][3]

People who may have an increased risk for systemic candidiasis include:[1][2][3]
  • People who have a weakened immune system (for example, people who have had an organ transplant,  have HIV/AIDS, or are on cancer chemotherapy)
  • Intensive care unit (ICU) patients
  • People who have had surgery, especially gastrointestinal surgery
  • People who have a central venous catheter
  • Very low-birth-weight infants
  • People who have taken broad-spectrum antibiotics
  • People who have a very low neutrophil (a type of white blood cell) count (neutropenia)
  • People who have kidney failure or are on hemodialysis
  • People who have diabetes
Last updated: 12/15/2016

Systemic candidiasis is usually suspected in people who have an increased risk of developing an invasiveCandida infection and have symptoms of an infection. Blood cultures (or cultures of other sterile fluids from the body such as cerebrospinal fluid) are then ordered to confirm the diagnosis.[1][2][3]

However, in 40-50% of cases when systemic candidiasis affects another part of the body, the blood culture may be negative.[1][2] In these cases, further testing will depend on which organ(s) or body system is infected.[1] As of 2016, medical researchers are hoping T2 magnetic resonance testing will be able to more accurately and easily detect all forms of systemic candidiasis.[5]
Last updated: 12/15/2016

Systemic candidiasis is usually treated with oral or intravenous (IV) antifungal medications, including echinocandin (caspofungin, micafungin, or anidulafungin) fluconazole, and amphotericin B. The specific type of medication and length of treatment will depend on many factors, including the age and health of the infected person, the location and severity of the infection, and the specific species of Candida causing the infection.[1][2][3][6] 

Antifungal medications may be given to certain high risk people in order to prevent the development of systemic candidiasis, however more studies are needed before it is clear if this practice is helpful.[2][6] 

For more information about the treatment of systemic candidiasis, please see the Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
Last updated: 12/15/2016

The long-term outlook (prognosis) for people with systemic candidiasis depends on many factors including the severity and location of the Candida infection, the general health of the infected person, and the timing of diagnosis and treatment. Because people who develop systemic candidiasis are usually already sick (often critically ill), it is hard to estimate the percentage of people who die from systemic candidiasis.[1][2][3] Mortality rate (percentage of people who die) in critically ill people who develop systemic candidiasis is estimated to be between 45-50%.[1] Estimates of the mortality rate for candidemia (Candida infection in the blood) range from 19-30%.[2] 
Last updated: 12/15/2016

Research helps us better understand diseases and can lead to advances in diagnosis and treatment. This section provides resources to help you learn about medical research and ways to get involved.

Clinical Research Resources

  • ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are related to Systemic candidiasis. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read descriptions of these studies. 

    Please note: Studies listed on the ClinicalTrials.gov website are listed for informational purposes only; being listed does not reflect an endorsement by GARD or the NIH. We strongly recommend that you talk with a trusted healthcare provider before choosing to participate in any clinical study.

These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

Where to Start

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic. 
  • The Merck Manual provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers. 

In-Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Merck Manual for health care professionals provides information on Systemic candidiasis.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Systemic candidiasis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

Questions sent to GARD may be posted here if the information could be helpful to others. We remove all identifying information when posting a question to protect your privacy. If you do not want your question posted, please let us know.

  1. Antinori S, Milazzo L, Sollima S, Galli M, and Corbellino M. Candidemia and invasive candidiasis in adults: A narrative review. Eur J Intern Med. October 2016; 34:21-28.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27394927.
  2. Invasive Candidiasis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. June 12 2015;https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/invasive/.
  3. Hidalgo JA. Candidiasis. Medscape Reference. November 4 2016;http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/213853-overview.
  4. Vyas JA. Endocarditis. Medline Plus. December 7 2014; https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001098.htm.
  5. Pfaller MA, Wolk DM,and Lowery TJ. T2MR and T2Candida: novel technology for the rapid diagnosis of candidemia and invasive candidiasis. Future Microbiol. January 2016; 11(1):103-17.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26371384.
  6. Pappas PG, Kauffman CA, Andes DR, Clancy CJ, Marr KA, Ostrosky-Zeichner L, Reboli AC, Schuster MG, Vazquez JA, Walsh TJ, Zaoutis TE, and Sobel JD. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. February 2016; 62(4):e1-50. http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/62/4/e1.


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1 kommentti:

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    VastaaPoista

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